Set-14 Reading Comprehension For SBI PO and SBI Clerk 2019 | Must Go Through These Questions

Dear Aspirants,

We are providing the most important Reading Comprehension for SBI PO 2019, SBI Clerk 2019 and all other competitive bank and insurance exams. These questions have very high chances to be asked in SBI PO 2019, SBI Clerk 2019.
Get the Best Test Series for SBI PO 2019 at the most affordable price (Based on Real Exam Pattern) – Click Here
Download the Best GK Gaming App for Current Affairs and GK (Bank+SSC)– Click here (App No 1)  (App No 2)

Directions:(1-10) Read the passage carefully and answer the following questions

India is facing one of its most serious droughts in recent memory – official estimates suggest that at least 330m people are likely to be affected by acute shortages of water. As the subcontinent awaits the imminent arrival of the monsoon rains, bringing relief to those who have suffered the long, dry and exceptionally warm summer, the crisis affecting India’s water resources is high on the public agenda.

Unprecedented drought demands unconventional responses, and there have been some fairly unusual attempts to address this year’s shortage. Perhaps most dramatic was the deployment of railway wagons to transport 500,000 litres of water per day across the Deccan plateau, with the train traversing more than 300km to provide relief to the district of Latur in Maharashtra state.

The need to shift water on this scale sheds light on the key issue that makes water planning in the Indian subcontinent so challenging. While the region gets considerable precipitation most years from the annual monsoon, the rain tends to fall in particular places – and for only a short period of time (about three months). This water needs to be stored, and made to last for the entire year.

In most years, it also means that there is often too much water in some places, resulting in as much distress due to flooding as there currently is due to drought. So there is a spatial challenge as well – water from the surplus regions needs to reach those with a shortfall, and the water train deployed in Maharashtra is one attempt to achieve this.

The current crisis has led the Indian government to announce that it hopes to resurrect an ambitious plan to try and link the major river basins of the country, under the Interlinking of Rivers (ILR) Project. The scale and magnitude of this exercise, both financial (it is estimated to cost more than £100 billion) and in engineering terms (involving the transfer of 174 billion cubic metres of water annually) is unprecedented.

Critics suggest that it is unlikely to work and is likely to create further ecological and social disruption, especially due to the uncertainties in weather and precipitation patterns due to climate change. There is a risk that other alternatives, perhaps less dramatic in their scope, might be neglected in the rush for the big headline-grabbing schemes.

A specific way forward might be to work more directly with natural processes to secure the regeneration of water sources at the local level. In the dry plains, this involves the revitalisation of aquifers and the replenishment of groundwater through recharge during the monsoon, as has been attempted already in some regions. In the hilly areas, there is considerable scope for investment in spring recharge and source sustainability, as has been undertaken on a significant scale in the Himalayan state of Sikkim.

1.  Why is water planning in the Indian subcontinent so challenging?

2. Which of the following was done to address the recent water crisis?

3. Which of the following is not a reason given in the passage as to why ILR is unlikely to work?

4. According to the author, what should India do address its water issues?

5. Which of the following places was badly affected by the water crisis?

6. Which of the following statements is true according to the passage?

7. Which of the following options is most similar in meaning to the word “imminent” as used in the passage?

8. Which of the following options is most opposite in meaning to the word “unprecedented” as used in the passage?

9. Which of the following options is most similar in meaning to the word “disruption” as used in the passage?

10. Which of the following options is most opposite in meaning to the word “replenishment” as used in the passage?

 

 

Check your Answers below:

 

  1. Directions:(1-10) Read the passage carefully and answer the following questions

    India is facing one of its most serious droughts in recent memory – official estimates suggest that at least 330m people are likely to be affected by acute shortages of water. As the subcontinent awaits the imminent arrival of the monsoon rains, bringing relief to those who have suffered the long, dry and exceptionally warm summer, the crisis affecting India’s water resources is high on the public agenda.

    Unprecedented drought demands unconventional responses, and there have been some fairly unusual attempts to address this year’s shortage. Perhaps most dramatic was the deployment of railway wagons to transport 500,000 litres of water per day across the Deccan plateau, with the train traversing more than 300km to provide relief to the district of Latur in Maharashtra state.

    The need to shift water on this scale sheds light on the key issue that makes water planning in the Indian subcontinent so challenging. While the region gets considerable precipitation most years from the annual monsoon, the rain tends to fall in particular places – and for only a short period of time (about three months). This water needs to be stored, and made to last for the entire year.

    In most years, it also means that there is often too much water in some places, resulting in as much distress due to flooding as there currently is due to drought. So there is a spatial challenge as well – water from the surplus regions needs to reach those with a shortfall, and the water train deployed in Maharashtra is one attempt to achieve this.

    The current crisis has led the Indian government to announce that it hopes to resurrect an ambitious plan to try and link the major river basins of the country, under the Interlinking of Rivers (ILR) Project. The scale and magnitude of this exercise, both financial (it is estimated to cost more than £100 billion) and in engineering terms (involving the transfer of 174 billion cubic metres of water annually) is unprecedented.

    Critics suggest that it is unlikely to work and is likely to create further ecological and social disruption, especially due to the uncertainties in weather and precipitation patterns due to climate change. There is a risk that other alternatives, perhaps less dramatic in their scope, might be neglected in the rush for the big headline-grabbing schemes.

    A specific way forward might be to work more directly with natural processes to secure the regeneration of water sources at the local level. In the dry plains, this involves the revitalisation of aquifers and the replenishment of groundwater through recharge during the monsoon, as has been attempted already in some regions. In the hilly areas, there is considerable scope for investment in spring recharge and source sustainability, as has been undertaken on a significant scale in the Himalayan state of Sikkim.

    1. Question

    Why is water planning in the Indian subcontinent so challenging?

    Ans:3
    In the third paragraph the author states that “The need to shift water on this scale sheds light on the key issue that makes water planning in the Indian subcontinent so challenging. While the region gets considerable precipitation most years from the annual monsoon, the rain tends to fall in particular places – and for only a short period of time (about three months).” Hence, option C.

  2. 2. Question

    Which of the following was done to address the recent water crisis?

    Ans:2
    Option C has not been mentioned in the passage. Option A has been mentioned as something the current government hopes to do – not something it is currently doing. In the fourth paragraph of the passage option B has been mentioned as an attempt made by the government to address water scarcity.

  3. 3. Question

    Which of the following is not a reason given in the passage as to why ILR is unlikely to work?

    Ans:4
    In the second last paragraph the author mentions the reasons why ILR is unlikely to work. Options a-c have been stated in the project as to why critics say the ILR project will fail. Though option D is true, it has not been given as a reason why the project would fail. Hence, option D.

  4. 4. Question

    According to the author, what should India do address its water issues?

    Ans:1
    Option c has not been mentioned as a recommendation in the passage. Though option B finds a mention in the passage, it is something the government is already doing and not something the author thinks the government should do. In the last paragraph, the author makes recommendations for addressing the water scarcity issue. Option A is directly given in the last paragraph as one of the methods by which India can address the water crisis. Hence, option A.

  5. 5. Question

    Which of the following places was badly affected by the water crisis?

    Ans:3
    Option a has not been mentioned in the passage. Though spring regeneration efforts have been undertaken in Sikkim, it is not mentioned that it is facing a water crisis. Option c is mentioned in the second paragraph in “Perhaps most dramatic was the deployment of railway wagons to transport 500,000 litres of water per day across the Deccan plateau, with the train traversing more than 300km to provide relief to the district of Latur in Maharashtra state.”. Hence, option C.

  6. 6. Question

    Which of the following statements is true according to the passage?

    Ans:4
    We can infer option B from first paragraph “official estimates suggest that at least 330m people are likely to be affected by acute shortages of water” and option C from the fifth paragrah “The scale and magnitude of this exercise, both financial (it is estimated to cost more than £100 billion) and in engineering terms (involving the transfer of 174 billion cubic metres of water annually) is unprecedented”. Hence, option D.

  7. 7. Question

    Which of the following options is most similar in meaning to the word “imminent” as used in the passage?

    Ans:5
    The word as used in the passage means something that is about to happen soon. Hence, the word most similar in meaning is option E.

  8. 8. Question

    Which of the following options is most opposite in meaning to the word “unprecedented” as used in the passage?

    Ans:3
    The word as used in the passage means something that has never occurred before. Hence, the word most opposite in meaning is option C.

  9. 9. Question

    Which of the following options is most similar in meaning to the word “disruption” as used in the passage?

    Ans:4
    The word as used in the passage means disturbance or problems which interrupt normal activity. Hence, the word closest in meaning is option D.

  10. 10. Question

    Which of the following options is most opposite in meaning to the word “replenishment” as used in the passage?

    Ans:5
    The word as used in the passage means to make full again or restore. The word most opposite in meaning is option E.