Set-26 Reading Comprehension For SBI PO and SBI Clerk 2019 | Must Go Through These Questions

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We are providing the most important Reading Comprehension for SBI PO 2019, SBI Clerk 2019 and all other competitive bank and insurance exams. These questions have very high chances to be asked in SBI PO 2019, SBI Clerk 2019.
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Direction (1-5): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

According to company lore, Yunnan Baiyao, a musty-smelling medical powder, played a vital role during the Long March. As China’s Communist troops fled from attacks in the 1930s, trekking thousands of miles to a new base, they spread its yellow granules on their wounds to staunch bleeding. To this day, instructions on the Yunnan Baiyao bottle recommend application after being shot or stabbed. Many Chinese households keep some in stock to deal with more run-of-the-mill cuts. But the government has recently put its maker into service to treat a different kind of ailment: the financial weakness of state-owned enterprises (SOEs). Yunnan Baiyao has emerged as a poster-child of China’s new round of SOE reform. The company, previously owned by the south-western province of Yunnan, sold a 50% stake to a private investor earlier this year. The same firm had tried to buy a slice of Yunnan Baiyao in 2009 but was blocked. Its success this time has been held up in the official press as proof that a push to overhaul sluggish state companies is at last gaining momentum under Xi Jinping, China’s president. But for many investors and analysts, the Yunnan Baiyao case proves just the opposite: that SOE reforms are stuck in a rut. The sale, after all, left half the company in state hands. And a traditional Chinese medical powder is far removed from industries such as energy and finance, which the government deems strategic and is less willing to open to private capital.

It is hard to overstate the importance of getting SOE reforms right. In the 1980s, when China was starting to open to the world, the state sector dominated its economy, accounting for nearly four-fifths of output. A big factor behind China’s remarkable growth since then has been the relative decline of SOEs, to the point that they account for less than a fifth of output today. As state firms stood still, a vibrant private sector sprouted around them. Over the past few years the state sector has, by several measures, stopped shrinking. There are still more than 150,000 SOEs in operation, two-thirds owned by local governments and the rest under central control. Private firms are much more productive, but state firms gobble up a disproportionate share of resources. They take about half of all bank loans and are the main culprits behind China’s big increase in corporate debt. Since 2015 investment by SOEs has grown faster than private-sector investment, reversing a decades-long trend. For China this has the makings of a damaging cycle. As growth slows, the government leans on SOEs to spend more; but this drives up their debt further and so weighs on the economy. Putting a stop to this sequence is vital for China if it is to become wealthy. The IMF estimates that an ambitious programme of SOE reform could expand the Chinese economy by nearly 10%, or about $1trn, over the next decade. The fate of China’s state firms is also a global concern. By international standards, they are already massive. China’s 200 biggest SOEs account for 9% of global revenues in coal mining, 6% in car making and 5% in construction. A series of mega-mergers currently under way is concentrating even more power in the hands of a few, giving them the heft to barge into new markets. For foreign firms this can smack of unfair competition, as if they are fighting against the Chinese state. The temptation for other countries to block foreign investments by SOEs will only increase, setting the stage for bitter disputes.

1. What is false regarding Yunnan Baiyao?

  1. It is a medical powder which is only used by army troops to treat wounds.
  2. Yunnan Baiyao has played a vital role in reform of state owned enterprise.
  3. Government has put a restriction on the sale of Yunnan Baiyao.

2. How author can say that state owned enterprises are getting momentum?

  1. Yunnan Baiyao’s success is a proof that state owned enterprises are getting momentum.
  2. Because governments are talking certain steps for the reform of state owned enterprises.
  3. Because a private investor bought 50 % stake in Yunnan Baiyao.

3. What is true about the state owned enterprises?

  1. In 1980’s SOEs dominated China’s economy.
  2. According to passage, decline of SOEs is responsible for growth of China.
  3. Stop in growth of state owned enterprises is responsible for growth of private firms.

4. What is true about the state owned enterprises?

  1. In 1980’s SOEs dominated China’s economy.
  2. According to passage, decline of SOEs is responsible for growth of China.
  3. Stop in growth of state owned enterprises is responsible for growth of private firms.

5. According to the passage, what are the wrong steps taken by government for increasing growth?

  1. For increasing growth governments are focusing more on state owned enterprises.
  2. Focusing on the growth of private sector.
  3. Governments leans on state owned enterprises to spend more.

Directions (6-10): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it.

The Supreme Court has struck a blow for the rights of the disabled, with a direction to the Central and State governments to provide full access to public facilities, such as buildings and transport, within stipulated deadlines. People with a disability form 2.21% of India’s population according to the 2011 Census. They have had a law for two decades to enable their full participation in society, but successive governments have done little to realise those guarantees. Now, in response to a public interest petition filed by a visually handicapped activist, the court has issued a series of orders: that all government buildings should be made accessible by June 2019; half of all government buildings in the capital cities should meet accessibility norms by December this year; the Railways should present a report in three months from December 15 on implementing station facilities; 10% of government public transport must be fully accessible by March 2018; and advisory boards should be formed by the States and Union Territories in three months. The court’s directions should be welcomed by the government and service providers as an opportunity to steer policy and practice towards a universal and humane system. For too long, planners and designers have built infrastructure for use only by able-bodied individuals, ignoring the aspirations of those with disabilities, and the letter of the law.

A transformation requires governments to also harness the power of newer technologies. Geolocation is one, and it enables targeted provision of services. It is eminently feasible, for instance, to aggregate the travel requirements of disabled people with the help of information technology and smartphones, and provide affordable shared transport using accessible vehicles. Given the emphasis on smart cities and upgraded urban facilities, such schemes should be given the highest priority and start-up ideas roped in. Railway stations and access to train carriages continue to pose hurdles for not just the disabled, but even elderly travellers. The Railways should embark on an urgent programme to retrofit all stations, and try simple solutions such as portable step ladders to help board and exit trains, since level boarding is not possible in most places. Cost is not the barrier to improving facilities; what is in short supply is the political will to change the design of public facilities and stick to professional codes. The Supreme Court said in a 1998 order on a petition seeking air travel concession, that while cost was a consideration, the true spirit and purpose of the law could not be ignored. Today India, which is richer than it was then, and has passed a new law in 2016 to strengthen the rights of the disabled, should demonstrate the will to implement it

6. Why supreme court directed to the central and state governments to provide full access to public facilities to disabled?

  1. Because disabled have lack of public facilities.
  2. Because government don’t have any law regarding the public facilities for disabled.
  3. Because 2.21 % of India’s population are disabled according to the census 2011.

7. According to the passage which can be true in given sentences?

  1. There is a law for disabled to enable their full participation in society.
  2. Percentage population of disabled in India is very low which can be neglected easily.
  3. According to law for disabled people , all governments buildings should be made accessible for disabled.

8. What are the key points of Supreme Court direction given to Central and State governments?

  1. According to direction all government buildings should be made accessible by disabled by June 2019.
  2. An advisory board should be formed by States and Union Territories in three months.
  3. 10 % of governments public transport must be fully accessible by disabled till March 2018.

9. What are the suggestions given by author to the government for diabled people?

  1. Government must use new technologies for transformation.
  2. There must be initiative by the government for start up ideas.
  3. Government should made proper law for disabled.

10. Which of the following is not true according to the passage?

  1. Need of political will is very important for providing facilities for disabled.
  2. According to author Railway should work swiftly to provide the accessibility to the disabled.
  3. Capital is the main reason that railway don’t have proper access for disabled people.

 

 

Check the answer below

 

 

 

Direction (1-5): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

According to company lore, Yunnan Baiyao, a musty-smelling medical powder, played a vital role during the Long March. As China’s Communist troops fled from attacks in the 1930s, trekking thousands of miles to a new base, they spread its yellow granules on their wounds to staunch bleeding. To this day, instructions on the Yunnan Baiyao bottle recommend application after being shot or stabbed. Many Chinese households keep some in stock to deal with more run-of-the-mill cuts. But the government has recently put its maker into service to treat a different kind of ailment: the financial weakness of state-owned enterprises (SOEs). Yunnan Baiyao has emerged as a poster-child of China’s new round of SOE reform. The company, previously owned by the south-western province of Yunnan, sold a 50% stake to a private investor earlier this year. The same firm had tried to buy a slice of Yunnan Baiyao in 2009 but was blocked. Its success this time has been held up in the official press as proof that a push to overhaul sluggish state companies is at last gaining momentum under Xi Jinping, China’s president. But for many investors and analysts, the Yunnan Baiyao case proves just the opposite: that SOE reforms are stuck in a rut. The sale, after all, left half the company in state hands. And a traditional Chinese medical powder is far removed from industries such as energy and finance, which the government deems strategic and is less willing to open to private capital.

It is hard to overstate the importance of getting SOE reforms right. In the 1980s, when China was starting to open to the world, the state sector dominated its economy, accounting for nearly four-fifths of output. A big factor behind China’s remarkable growth since then has been the relative decline of SOEs, to the point that they account for less than a fifth of output today. As state firms stood still, a vibrant private sector sprouted around them. Over the past few years the state sector has, by several measures, stopped shrinking. There are still more than 150,000 SOEs in operation, two-thirds owned by local governments and the rest under central control. Private firms are much more productive, but state firms gobble up a disproportionate share of resources. They take about half of all bank loans and are the main culprits behind China’s big increase in corporate debt. Since 2015 investment by SOEs has grown faster than private-sector investment, reversing a decades-long trend. For China this has the makings of a damaging cycle. As growth slows, the government leans on SOEs to spend more; but this drives up their debt further and so weighs on the economy. Putting a stop to this sequence is vital for China if it is to become wealthy. The IMF estimates that an ambitious programme of SOE reform could expand the Chinese economy by nearly 10%, or about $1trn, over the next decade. The fate of China’s state firms is also a global concern. By international standards, they are already massive. China’s 200 biggest SOEs account for 9% of global revenues in coal mining, 6% in car making and 5% in construction. A series of mega-mergers currently under way is concentrating even more power in the hands of a few, giving them the heft to barge into new markets. For foreign firms this can smack of unfair competition, as if they are fighting against the Chinese state. The temptation for other countries to block foreign investments by SOEs will only increase, setting the stage for bitter disputes.

1. Question

What is false regarding Yunnan Baiyao?

  1. It is a medical powder which is only used by army troops to treat wounds.
  2. Yunnan Baiyao has played a vital role in reform of state owned enterprise.
  3. Government has put a restriction on the sale of Yunnan Baiyao.
Ans: 3
1 and 3 both are wrong because there are no restriction on the sale of Yunnan Baiyao and it is also used by house hold not only by army troops.

2. Question

How author can say that state owned enterprises are getting momentum?

  1. Yunnan Baiyao’s success is a proof that state owned enterprises are getting momentum.
  2. Because governments are talking certain steps for the reform of state owned enterprises.
  3. Because a private investor bought 50 % stake in Yunnan Baiyao.
Ans: 1
According to passage it is true that SOEs are getting momentum because of Yunnan Baiyao’s success.

3. Question

What is true about the state owned enterprises?

  1. In 1980’s SOEs dominated China’s economy.
  2. According to passage, decline of SOEs is responsible for growth of China.
  3. Stop in growth of state owned enterprises is responsible for growth of private firms.
Ans: 5
According to passage all of the three are true about SOE’s.

4. Question

What is the disadvantage of state owned enterprises for China’s economy?

  1. state owned enterprises uses more resources and obtained output is very less.
  2. state owned enterprises take almost half of all bank loans.
  3. Investment in state owned enterprises are declining regularly.
Ans: 4
1 and 2 are the main disadvantages of SOEs.

5. Question

According to the passage, what are the wrong steps taken by government for increasing growth?

  1. For increasing growth governments are focusing more on state owned enterprises.
  2. Focusing on the growth of private sector.
  3. Governments leans on state owned enterprises to spend more.
Ans: 3
According to the passage we can conclude that 1 and 2 are the wrong steps that are taken by government.

Directions (6-10): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it.

The Supreme Court has struck a blow for the rights of the disabled, with a direction to the Central and State governments to provide full access to public facilities, such as buildings and transport, within stipulated deadlines. People with a disability form 2.21% of India’s population according to the 2011 Census. They have had a law for two decades to enable their full participation in society, but successive governments have done little to realise those guarantees. Now, in response to a public interest petition filed by a visually handicapped activist, the court has issued a series of orders: that all government buildings should be made accessible by June 2019; half of all government buildings in the capital cities should meet accessibility norms by December this year; the Railways should present a report in three months from December 15 on implementing station facilities; 10% of government public transport must be fully accessible by March 2018; and advisory boards should be formed by the States and Union Territories in three months. The court’s directions should be welcomed by the government and service providers as an opportunity to steer policy and practice towards a universal and humane system. For too long, planners and designers have built infrastructure for use only by able-bodied individuals, ignoring the aspirations of those with disabilities, and the letter of the law.

A transformation requires governments to also harness the power of newer technologies. Geolocation is one, and it enables targeted provision of services. It is eminently feasible, for instance, to aggregate the travel requirements of disabled people with the help of information technology and smartphones, and provide affordable shared transport using accessible vehicles. Given the emphasis on smart cities and upgraded urban facilities, such schemes should be given the highest priority and start-up ideas roped in. Railway stations and access to train carriages continue to pose hurdles for not just the disabled, but even elderly travellers. The Railways should embark on an urgent programme to retrofit all stations, and try simple solutions such as portable step ladders to help board and exit trains, since level boarding is not possible in most places. Cost is not the barrier to improving facilities; what is in short supply is the political will to change the design of public facilities and stick to professional codes. The Supreme Court said in a 1998 order on a petition seeking air travel concession, that while cost was a consideration, the true spirit and purpose of the law could not be ignored. Today India, which is richer than it was then, and has passed a new law in 2016 to strengthen the rights of the disabled, should demonstrate the will to implement it

6. Question

Why supreme court directed to the central and state governments to provide full access to public facilities to disabled?

  1. Because disabled have lack of public facilities.
  2. Because government don’t have any law regarding the public facilities for disabled.
  3. Because 2.21 % of India’s population are disabled according to the census 2011.
Ans: 1
only 1 is the genuine reason for court direction. 2 is wrong because there is already a law. 3 is wrong because it doesn’t matter how much population are disabled.

7. Question

According to the passage which can be true in given sentences?

  1. There is a law for disabled to enable their full participation in society.
  2. Percentage population of disabled in India is very low which can be neglected easily.
  3. According to law for disabled people , all governments buildings should be made accessible for disabled.
Ans: 3
2 is not true according to the passage.

8. Question

What are the key points of Supreme Court direction given to Central and State governments?

  1. According to direction all government buildings should be made accessible by disabled by June 2019.
  2. An advisory board should be formed by States and Union Territories in three months.
  3. 10 % of governments public transport must be fully accessible by disabled till March 2018.
Ans: 5
All of the given are the key point of Supreme Court direction.

9. Question

What are the suggestions given by author to the government for diabled people?

  1. Government must use new technologies for transformation.
  2. There must be initiative by the government for start up ideas.
  3. Government should made proper law for disabled.
Ans: 4
3 is not the suggestion given by author because there is already law for disabled.

10. Question

Which of the following is not true according to the passage?

  1. Need of political will is very important for providing facilities for disabled.
  2. According to author Railway should work swiftly to provide the accessibility to the disabled.
  3. Capital is the main reason that railway don’t have proper access for disabled people.
Ans:  3
3 is wrong because according to the author there is need of political will for facilities.