Set-7 Phrase Replacement For SBI PO and SBI Clerk 2019 | Must Go Through These Questions

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We are providing the most important Phrase Replacement for SBI PO 2019, SBI Clerk 2019 and all other competitive bank and insurance exams. These questions have very high chances to be asked in SBI PO 2019, SBI Clerk 2019.
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Direction(1-5):In each of the following questions, a sentence is given with the phrase or idiom highlighted in bold. Identify the option that contains a word similar to the phrase contextually as well as grammatically and can replace it. If none of the options express the similar meaning, mark ‘None’ as the right answer. If all the options fit in the sentence grammatically and contextually, mark ‘All’ as the right answer.

1. Nearly five hundred years later there sat upon the throne, an Emperor named Constantine.

2. Jenny’s father died in a gruesome accident last year, and she has still not got over it.

3. He sent for the soldier in great haste, and when he arrived, he congratulated him for his victory.

4. In the sixties, when the language policy ran into rough weather, the three-language formula was conceptualised as an acceptable solution.

5. Sluggish growth in labour-intensive exports comes at a time when global trade has picked up pace, and when currency levels have been relatively stable.

Direction(6-10):Which of the following phrases (1), (2), and (3) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in bold letters to make the sentence grammatically correct? Choose the option which reflects the correct usage of phrase contextually and grammatically.

6. Black women were forced to confront the interplay between racism and sexism and to figure on how to make black men think about gender issues while making white women think about racial issues.

1. work out
2. figure out
3. figure up

7. It inspired the Florentines to hold on to Milanese aggression and to reshape their identity as the seat of “the rebirth of letters” and the champions of freedom.

1. resist
2. hold out against
3. defy

8. These cancers frequently do not go away with treatment, but they can just pull down and still be seen on radiologic imaging for some time.

1. be quietened
2. quiet down
3. pull over

9. The move, which attracted a record $16 million from biotechnology advocates, ran across one of the strongest state pro-life movements in the country.

1. ran up agains
2. ran against
3. ran into

10. Interestingly, places where coriander is especially popular, such as Central America and India, have few peoples with these genes, which might explain how the herb was able to become such a mainstay in those regions.

1. fewer people
2. few people
3. fewest people

 

 

Check your Answers below:

 

 

  1. Direction(1-5):In each of the following questions, a sentence is given with the phrase or idiom highlighted in bold. Identify the option that contains a word similar to the phrase contextually as well as grammatically and can replace it. If none of the options express the similar meaning, mark ‘None’ as the right answer. If all the options fit in the sentence grammatically and contextually, mark ‘All’ as the right answer.

    1. Question

    Nearly five hundred years later there sat upon the throne, an Emperor named Constantine.

    Ans: 3
    The phrase ‘sit on the throne’ means to rule. Dictated – instructed in an authoritative manner. Elected – voted by citizens in a democratic society. Reigned – ruled. Presided – oversaw. A is incorrect as the context does not indicate whether the emperor was authoritative. B and D make no contextual sense as it has not been told to us what the emperor presided over. C is the right answer.
  2. 2. Question

    Jenny’s father died in a gruesome accident last year, and she has still not got over it.

    Ans: 1
    The phrase ‘get over something’ means to feel better about something bad that happened. Recover – to feel better or accept something. Transfer – move. Only A makes contextual and grammatical sense and gives us the meaning of the given phrase.
  3. 3. Question

    He sent for the soldier in great haste, and when he arrived, he congratulated him for his victory.

    Ans: 3
    The phrase ‘in great haste’ means to do something quickly or at once. Gradually – slowly. Miserably – sadly. Enthusiastically – energetically. Immediately – at once. D is the right answer.
  4. 4. Question

    In the sixties, when the language policy ran into rough weather, the three-language formula was conceptualised as an acceptable solution.

      Ans: 2
    The phrase ‘run into/ hit rough weather’ means to fail or lose popularity or deteriorate. Conceive – think of/ devise. Collapse – fail/ lose popularity or quality. Concede – give into demands. Console – comfort. B is the right answer.
  5. 5. Question

    Sluggish growth in labour-intensive exports comes at a time when global trade has picked up pace, and when currency levels have been relatively stable.

    Ans: 5
    The sentence exhibits a positive tone, meaning a positive word can only replace the highlighted phrase. All the four options are positive here and on the account of them supplying the same contextually correct meaning, option E will be the correct answer.

    Direction(6-10):Which of the following phrases (1), (2), and (3) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in bold letters to make the sentence grammatically correct? Choose the option which reflects the correct usage of phrase contextually and grammatically.

    6. Question

    Black women were forced to confront the interplay between racism and sexism and to figure on how to make black men think about gender issues while making white women think about racial issues.

    1. work out
    2. figure out
    3. figure up

    Ans: 2
    ‘figure on’ meaning ‘expect’ makes no meaning in the sentence. ‘work out’ — ‘have a good result’; ‘figure out’ — ‘understand’; ‘figure up’ — ‘calculate’. Only ‘figure out’ makes sense in the sentence, hence (b) is the correct option.
  6. 7. Question

    It inspired the Florentines to hold on to Milanese aggression and to reshape their identity as the seat of “the rebirth of letters” and the champions of freedom.

    1. resist
    2. hold out against
    3. defy

    Ans: 5
    ‘hold on to’ — ‘grasp tightly’. The highlighted words do not convey any meaning in the sentence. All the three options — ‘hold out against’, ‘resist’ and ‘defy’ have similar meanings (confront with resistance) and are correct in the context of the sentence.
  7. 8. Question

    These cancers frequently do not go away with treatment, but they can just pull down and still be seen on radiologic imaging for some time.

    1. be quietened
    2. quiet down
    3. pull over

      Ans: 3
    ‘pull down’ — ‘destroy’; ‘pull over’ — ‘to bring (a vehicle) to a stop’. Neither of the two fits in the sentence appropriately. Both the phrases in 1 and 2, ‘be quietened’ and ‘quiet down’ have a similar implication: ‘to quiet down’, which can be used here in the context of ‘cancers’. The correct option is (c).
  8. 9. Question

    The move, which attracted a record $16 million from biotechnology advocates, ran across one of the strongest state pro-life movements in the country.

    1. ran up against
    2. ran against
    3. ran into

    Ans: 5
    ‘ran across’ — ‘found by chance’ — unsuitable in the context of the sentence. The phrases in the three options (‘ran up against’, ‘ran against’, ‘ran into’) are all appropriate in the sentence — meaning is ‘encountered an unexpected difficulty).
  9. 10. Question

    Interestingly, places where coriander is especially popular, such as Central America and India, have few peoples with these genes, which might explain how the herb was able to become such a mainstay in those regions.

    1. fewer people
    2. few people
    3. fewest people

    Ans: 4
    The term ‘peoples’ is used to indicate many different races, groups or communities. Hence, the highlighted phrase is incorrectly used in the sentence. Both the phrases in (1) and (2) can be used to replace it — the comparative form ‘fewer’ can be used to compare the people of Central America and India with the rest of the world.

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