Set-8 Reading Comprehension For SBI PO and SBI Clerk 2019 | Must Go Through These Questions

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Directions:(1-10) Read the below passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

“How came you to think of the Infant School system of teaching?”—is a question that I have often been asked; and my friends think it advisable that it should, in part at least, be answered. In few words, then, I would reply,—circumstances forced me to it. Born an only child, under peculiar circumstances, and living in an isolated neighbourhood, I had no childish companions from infancy; I was, consequently, thrown much on my own resources, and early became a thinker, and in some measure a contriver too. I beheld a beautiful world around me, full of everything to admire and to win attention. As soon as I could think at all, I saw that there must be a Maker, Governor, and Protector of this world. Such things as had life won my admiration, and thus I became very fond of animals. Flowers and fruits, stones and minerals, I also soon learned to observe and to mark their differences. This led to enquiries as to how they came—where from—who made them? My mother told me they came from God, that he made them and all things that I saw; and also that he made herself and me. From that moment I never doubted His wonderful existence. I could not, nor did I have, at that age, any correct idea of God; but I soon learned to have elevated notions of His works, and through them I was led to adore something invisible—something I was convinced of within, but could not see. My mother, to my knowledge, never deceived me, or told me an untruth: therefore, I believed her implicitly; and to this day I never doubted. So much for the implanting an early faith in the Unseen. But the beautiful world and the things in it which I saw, and with which I came in contact, Oh! how wonderful they appeared to me! They were my companions! Other children were strange to me, and they were not nigh either to help or to thwart me.

My mother was my oracle during the first six years of childhood, resolving my difficulties and answering my questions. I was happy—very happy! and still look back to those days with indescribable pleasure and satisfaction. I had no tasks. I was not pestered with A.B. C., nor ab. eb. ib. From things my parents chiefly taught me my first lessons, and they have been as durable as life. For days and weeks did I study such lessons. My parents waited till I asked for information, and when it was required it was never denied. The world and the wonders in it formed as it were a heaven to me. I am told I gave but little trouble at this age. In the beautiful fields and wild coppices about Hornsey, as yet un-encroached upon by suburban extension; and by the side of the then solitary banks of the New River, I was always to be found. In cold and wet weather I had a stock of similar lessons in my home. Small live animals were my constant companions; they taught me that love begets love. I did love and delight in them, and when they died I mourned their loss. Every day brought me new information, which my parents perfected. At length the alphabet was mastered, and afterwards spelling, reading, and so forth. My mind being thus previously filled with ideas, the acquirement of words and abstract terms became less irksome, and I cannot remember that thus far it cost me any trouble, much less pain. Information of every kind fit for childhood then really gave me pleasure. No doubt I am greatly indebted to my parents for their judicious management. My father always in the evening, took great pains to explain things to me; he nurtured but never crammed; he knew when to teach and when to let alone. Unfortunately, through very peculiar circumstances, I was removed from the immediate care and superintendence of both parents rather early in life; and, at an age the most dangerous, was left to grapple nearly alone with the wide world and the beings in it, with little of either parental guidance. It was then I saw the immense importance and advantage of early impressions. To me they were of incalculable benefit, and no doubt led, when I became a man, to the thoughts which ended in the development and practical working of the Infant System and method of education.

1. What did the author think about other children during his childhood?

2. What does the author think of God?

3. As a child, what was the author’s attitude towards animals?

4. Which of the following statements is/are TRUE about the author?
1) He did not have any friends while growing up.
2) He lived in an isolated neighbourhood while growing up.
3) He was the only child in his family.

5. According to the passage which of the following is NOT DEFINITELY TRUE about the author?

6. Which of the following can be inferred about the author?

7. Which of the following is a synonym of the word “oracle” as used in the passage?

8. Which of the following is a synonym of the word “grapple” as used in the passage?

9. Which of the following is an antonym of the word “solitary” as used in the passage?

10. Which of the following is an antonym of the word “irksome” as used in the passage?

 

 

Check your Answers below:

 

 

  • Directions:(1-10) Read the below passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

    “How came you to think of the Infant School system of teaching?”—is a question that I have often been asked; and my friends think it advisable that it should, in part at least, be answered. In few words, then, I would reply,—circumstances forced me to it. Born an only child, under peculiar circumstances, and living in an isolated neighbourhood, I had no childish companions from infancy; I was, consequently, thrown much on my own resources, and early became a thinker, and in some measure a contriver too. I beheld a beautiful world around me, full of everything to admire and to win attention. As soon as I could think at all, I saw that there must be a Maker, Governor, and Protector of this world. Such things as had life won my admiration, and thus I became very fond of animals. Flowers and fruits, stones and minerals, I also soon learned to observe and to mark their differences. This led to enquiries as to how they came—where from—who made them? My mother told me they came from God, that he made them and all things that I saw; and also that he made herself and me. From that moment I never doubted His wonderful existence. I could not, nor did I have, at that age, any correct idea of God; but I soon learned to have elevated notions of His works, and through them I was led to adore something invisible—something I was convinced of within, but could not see. My mother, to my knowledge, never deceived me, or told me an untruth: therefore, I believed her implicitly; and to this day I never doubted. So much for the implanting an early faith in the Unseen. But the beautiful world and the things in it which I saw, and with which I came in contact, Oh! how wonderful they appeared to me! They were my companions! Other children were strange to me, and they were not nigh either to help or to thwart me.

    My mother was my oracle during the first six years of childhood, resolving my difficulties and answering my questions. I was happy—very happy! and still look back to those days with indescribable pleasure and satisfaction. I had no tasks. I was not pestered with A.B. C., nor ab. eb. ib. From things my parents chiefly taught me my first lessons, and they have been as durable as life. For days and weeks did I study such lessons. My parents waited till I asked for information, and when it was required it was never denied. The world and the wonders in it formed as it were a heaven to me. I am told I gave but little trouble at this age. In the beautiful fields and wild coppices about Hornsey, as yet un-encroached upon by suburban extension; and by the side of the then solitary banks of the New River, I was always to be found. In cold and wet weather I had a stock of similar lessons in my home. Small live animals were my constant companions; they taught me that love begets love. I did love and delight in them, and when they died I mourned their loss. Every day brought me new information, which my parents perfected. At length the alphabet was mastered, and afterwards spelling, reading, and so forth. My mind being thus previously filled with ideas, the acquirement of words and abstract terms became less irksome, and I cannot remember that thus far it cost me any trouble, much less pain. Information of every kind fit for childhood then really gave me pleasure. No doubt I am greatly indebted to my parents for their judicious management. My father always in the evening, took great pains to explain things to me; he nurtured but never crammed; he knew when to teach and when to let alone. Unfortunately, through very peculiar circumstances, I was removed from the immediate care and superintendence of both parents rather early in life; and, at an age the most dangerous, was left to grapple nearly alone with the wide world and the beings in it, with little of either parental guidance. It was then I saw the immense importance and advantage of early impressions. To me they were of incalculable benefit, and no doubt led, when I became a man, to the thoughts which ended in the development and practical working of the Infant System and method of education.

    1. Question

    What did the author think about other children during his childhood?

    Ans:3

    In the first para the author says, “Other children were strange to me, and they were not nigh either to help or to thwart me.”

    From this we can understand that the author did not have other children as friends at all.

  • 2. Question

    What does the author think of God?

    Ans:3
    In the first para the author says, “This led to enquiries as to how they came—where from—who made them? My mother told me they came from God, that he made them and all things that I saw; and also that he made herself and me. From that moment I never doubted His wonderful existence. I could not, nor did I have, at that age, any correct idea of God; but I soon learned to have elevated notions of His works, and through them I was led to adore something invisible—something I was convinced of within, but could not see. My mother, to my knowledge, never deceived me, or told me an untruth: therefore, I believed her implicitly; and to this day I never doubted.”
    From this we can say that the author to this day believes in the existence of God.
  • 3. Question

    As a child, what was the author’s attitude towards animals?

    Ans:1
    In the first paragraph the author says, “As soon as I could think at all, I saw that there must be a Maker, Governor, and Protector of this world. Such things as had life won my admiration, and thus I became very fond of animals.”
    In the second paragraph the author says, “Small live animals were my constant companions; they taught me that love begets love. I did love and delight in them, and when they died I mourned their loss.”
    From these lines we can infer that as a child the author was very fond of animals and mourned their loss when they died.
  • 4. Question

    Which of the following statements is/are TRUE about the author?
    1) He did not have any friends while growing up.
    2) He lived in an isolated neighbourhood while growing up.
    3) He was the only child in his family.

    Ans:5
    In the first paragraph the author says, “Born an only child, under peculiar circumstances, and living in an isolated neighbourhood, I had no childish companions from infancy.”
    From this we can understand that all the three statements given in the question are true about the author.
  • 5. Question

    According to the passage which of the following is NOT DEFINITELY TRUE about the author?

    Ans:4
    From the passage we can understand that when the author was very young and living with his parents he did not undergo any formal education. But we do not know about what happened after he got separated from his parents. Thus Option D is not definitely true.
  • 6. Question

    Which of the following can be inferred about the author?

    Ans:4
    In the beginning of the passage the author says, “How came you to think of the Infant School system of teaching?”—is a question that I have often been asked; and my friends think it advisable that it should, in part at least, be answered.
    Also, in the last line of the passage the author says, “To me they were of incalculable benefit, and no doubt led, when I became a man, to the thoughts which ended in the development and practical working of the Infant System and method of education.”
    From both these instances we can infer that the author of the passage is the founding father of the Infant School system of teaching.
  • 7. Question

    Which of the following is a synonym of the word “oracle” as used in the passage?

    Ans:4
    “Oracle” in the given context, means “a person or thing regarded as an infallible authority on something”. The word “expert” is closest in meaning to oracle.
  • 8. Question

    Which of the following is a synonym of the word “grapple” as used in the passage?

    Ans:2
    “Grapple” means “struggle to deal with or overcome”. The word “confront” is closest in meaning to grapple.
  • 9. Question

    Which of the following is an antonym of the word “solitary” as used in the passage?

    Ans:5
    “Solitary” means “lonely” and the antonym is “accompanied”.
  • 10. Question

    Which of the following is an antonym of the word “irksome” as used in the passage?

    Ans:1
    “Irksome” means “irritating” and the antonym is “untroubling”.